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5 Tips for Shopping Local on a Budget

Heather van Mil3157 views
shop local

 

Have you checked out some of the amazing kid’s brands we’ve got here in BC? We’re spoiled with so many great local businesses who are creating lines of clothing and accessories that are not only high quality, but pretty darn adorable too. But one complaint I hear quite often when I talk about buying and supporting local is how it’s too expensive. And I get it, we’ve all got bills to pay and mouths to feed. But buying local comes with a lot of other benefits, like supporting the families behind the labels, and often the quality is worth the price tag. There’s also other ways to balance your spending if you splurge on a few pieces from your favourite local shops. In this post I’m going to share some favourites from some local brands and a few tips on how you can stretch your kid’s clothing budget while buying local.

5 Tips for shopping local on a budget:

  1. Mix & match pieces from a local brand with cheaper pieces with some less expensive items from large stores, thrift stores, and hand- me- downs. This is a great way to stock up on some staples for their closet without breaking the bank. Instead of buying all brand- new, incorporating some used items bought for just a few dollars or hand- me- downs can balance out spending.
  2. Buy gender- neutral clothes so that when one kiddo outgrows an item the next in line can wear it after. This is also great if you share/ rotate clothes with friends and family (another great money saver).
  3. Buy bigger sizes– certain items, such as leggings and sweaters, can be bought and worn a little big to max the amount of wear your kids will get out of them. The same goes when they start to get a little small- rolling up the legs of leggings is cute for Spring/ Summer when they get a little short, and rolling the sleeves of long- sleeve tees and sweaters is cute if the arms aren’t quite long enough anymore- getting a little creative can squeeze out an extra month or two of wear.
  4. Shop the sales. Local shops are always offering sales on new items, out- of- season pieces, and free shipping.  These are always great chances to stock up. Make sure you’re following your favourite brands on social media or subscribing to their emails to stay informed about deals and discounts.
  5. Make wish/ gift lists. This is perfect for when you see an item you’d like but may not have it in the budget. Note the brand, size, and any other info so you can request items for gifts- great for those who like to give practical gifts like clothes!- so when you get asked for gift ideas you have them handy (how often do you get asked and can’t think of any?!). Some brands even have the option of adding items to online registries to make it even simpler for you.

See below for a few mix & match ideas featuring pieces from some of my favourite local brands paired with items found on sale, at thrift stores, etc. I hope this shows you that to buy local doesn’t always mean breaking the budget! What are some of your favourite local shops?

shopping local
Shirt- Vonbon | Leggings- Carters (bought at a thrift store)

 

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Shirt- H & M | Leggings- The Little Moore Shop

 

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Onesie- Carters | Harems- Vonbon

 

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Jeans- Old Navy | T- shirt- King and Sage

3 reasons to love local:

  1. You’re supporting your local community and economy
    When you buy from a small brand, you’re supporting a family just like yours. Many of the local brands also buy from local suppliers and hire locally to produce the items they sell. 
  2. The pieces are designed and made with love, and it shows
    Small brands care about the quality of their pieces and a lot of care goes into ensuring they’re not only comfortable to wear, but durable and will stand the test of time.  
  3. You know where the clothes are coming from
    A lot of local brands design and produce their items locally, not half way around the world in places with poor working conditions. They also usually hire locally, creating jobs for locals in their community (see #1).

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